Whole Wheat VS. White Flour

About

The term whole wheat refers to flour that has been made with grains that contains the whole wheat husk.

            The health benefits of wheat depend entirely on the form in which you eat it. These benefits will be few if you select wheat that has been processed into 60% extraction, bleached white flour. 60% extraction—the standard for most wheat products in the United States, including breads, noodles and pastas, baked goods like rolls or biscuits, and cookies—means that 40% of the original wheat grain was removed, and only 60% is left. Unfortunately, the 40% that gets removed includes the bran and the germ of the wheat grain—its most nutrient-rich parts. In the process of making 60% extraction flour, over half of the vitamin B1, B2, B3, E, folic acid, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, iron, and fiber are lost. (whfoods)

Fiber

Whole wheat flour retains its fiber content, which so many of us are lacking in our diet, while white flour is often stripped of its fiber content. Whole wheat flour contains about 4 x more fiber per serving than white flour.

Blood sugar

White flour acts almost as if it where candy when it hits our blood stream.

            Any carbohydrate-containing food — including those containing either whole-wheat and white flour — has some effect on your blood sugar. After you eat a meal, your body breaks the carbohydrates from your food into glucose, a simple sugar. This glucose then enters your bloodstream, so it can circulate throughout your body and provide fuel to your cells. The glycemic index, or GI, of a food serves as a measure of how quickly this process occurs. High-GI foods lead to rapid blood sugar spikes and subsequent crashes that leave you hungry and irritable shortly after eating. Low-GI foods absorb more slowly to prevent blood sugar spikes and crashes, so you’re satisfied for longer after your meal. Bread made with 100 percent whole-wheat flour has a GI of 51, according to Harvard Medical School, while bread made with white wheat flour has a GI of 71. If you seek to regulate your blood sugar after a meal, choose foods made with whole-wheat flour.(Healthyeating)

 

Bottom line: Whole-wheat is a way better choice than white flour.

 

Which do you prefer and why? Comment below!

 

References:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=66

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/healthy-wholewheat-flour-vs-white-3305.html

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